Interview Transcripts

Louise Marley: Writing Fantasy for Adults and YA 5/15/08



Legend:
Questions from the Audience are presented in red.
Answers by the Speaker are in black.
The Moderator's comments are in blue.

Mary Rosenblum

Welcome to our Professional Connection live interview.

Tonight we'll be chatting with Louise Marley, fantasy writer for adults and YA and also a Long Ridge instructor now.

Louise Marley's first novel, Sing the Light, the first of the Singers of Nevya novels, was published in 1995, and since then she has been publishing steadily, sometimes against the odds. The Terrorists of Irustan represented her passion for feminist social science fiction, and The Glass Harmonica her love of music, as with the Nevya novels. The Child Goddess speaks to both her love of children and concern for those who are abused or abandoned, and to her fascination with religious life. Airs Beneath the Moon and Airs and Graces, the first of the Toby Bishop novels, set out in a different direction.

Toby Bishop is the pen name that she uses for this YA fantasy line.

It has flying horses, no less. How can you lose? J

And it's a very nice series with a girl as the main character.

You can read about her many accomplishments at http://www.louisemarley.com/ or http://www.tobybishop.net/

Mary Rosenblum

Hi, Louise.

Louise Marley

Hi!

Mary Rosenblum

Let’s  do start from the beginning. How did you get started writing in the first place?

Louise Marley

I started like a lot of people do, I think, by telling stories to my son when he was little! Those turned into book ideas, and I was off and running.

Mary Rosenblum

That's interesting. Was YA an interest of yours from the start?

Louise Marley

I started with picture books, but I had NO talent at all. Then I went straight to adult. Young adult came later

when I had the great good fortune to have an editor ask for a YA nove.

Mary Rosenblum

Which book was that?

Louise Marley

That was SINGER IN THE SNOW. I revisited the world of Nevya, which was the home for my first three novels.

Mary Rosenblum

And that was as Louise Marley, right?

(I love that book by the way).

Louise Marley

Right. I wrote all my books as Louise Marley until these last three. (And thanks for the kind words.)

Mary Rosenblum

So why the switch to Toby Bishop?

Louise Marley

There are a couple of reasons. First, THE HORSEMISTRESS SAGA is completely different fare from anything I'd done before . . .

Also, it's often good for a writer to have different names to acquire a different readership. . .

And I chose Toby Bishop because I like it, and because it's androgynous.

Mary Rosenblum

I figured that you selected an androgynous name on purpose. Alas, it does matter.

Louise Marley

Isn't it amazing that it still matters? But there's a prejudice toward male names. Slight, but real.

sailor

What are the main differences between writing for adult and YA?

Louise Marley

Hi, sailor! The principal difference is the age of the protagonists.

I can elaborate on that .

My editor asked for "the kind of book I write", simply with younger characters. YA publishers don't worry about

language, sexual content (except that it's offstage) or mature subject matter.

Mary Rosenblum

Did you find yourself addressing issues that a person that age would be dealing with?

Louise Marley

Yes. It wasn't hard to remember the things that were important to me when I was a teenager. Of course, my characters

have other issues to worry about, because they become professional Singers with enormous responsibilities at a very young age.

Mary Rosenblum

What about the main character in your horse mistress series?

Louise Marley

Oh, my darling Larkyn! She's very, very young when the book starts, only fourteen. And this great challenge is thrust on her,

to learn to fly a winged horse, and to keep the Duke from taking him away from her.

Mary Rosenblum

So you are indeed addressing something that will engage readers of that age

that determination to do something adults tell you you shouldn't do. J

Or can't do!

Louise Marley

Yes! Because we want our characters, and particularly our protagonists, to be active in determining what happens .

Not to be passive. We want them to act independently, not be acted upon by external forces. Kids do that instinctively!

janecj333

How did your publisher react to the male pen name?

Louise Marley

My editor knows all about the issues with bias in the book buyers toward male names. And actually

Toby could be either a woman's or a man's name.

k c morlock

Where was the photo at the top of the page taken?

Mary Rosenblum

I love that picture!

Louise Marley

I was in Corona, in Tuscany, Italy, on a lovely trip with my husband. I adore Italy, and especially the eastern hills of Tuscany.

Lucky me, I know!

lottiemae

Do you think it is easier to write fantasy for adults or YA?

Louise Marley

Ha, lottiemae! I think writing is hard no matter WHO you write for!

But I think it goes better if you write what you love, and worry about finding the audience after you've created your world.

I didn't really intend for THE HORSEMISTRESS SAGA to by YA, but there you are. That's the audience it found.

Mary Rosenblum

Was it marketed as a YA by the publisher? Or did they decide it was YA after they found out who was buying it?

Louise Marley

So interesting, because the latter is what happened. After the covers were created (and they REALLY look YA)

it turned out younger readers were the principal audience. By younger, I mean teens, not children. So I ended up

with adult and young adult readers, both, but principally young adults.

Mary Rosenblum

Let's see, you have two books out in that series now, right?

Louise Marley

Yes. AIRS BENEATH THE MOON and AIRS AND GRACES. AIRS OF NIGHT AND SEA comes in December. I'm done writing it!

Mary Rosenblum

Oh, wonderful! Are you planning for number four?

Louise Marley

Some of my fans (bless them all) have asked for stories of Larkyn when she's grown up, so I'm considering that.

rae

About how many pages are each of your books?

Louise Marley

This is a good question! My young adult contract for SINGER IN THE SNOW actually specified a word count, which was

a new thing for me. it was 60,000 words, which is about 300 properly formatted manuscript pages. (See how I snuck

that in there?) My HORSEMISTRESS SAGA manuscripts are longer, about 425 pages each.

Mary Rosenblum

And those are manuscript pages. Book pages depend on the page design and font size used.

Louise Marley

Right. The usual thing for me is a book of about 350 pages, published. But there's a wide range.

charie'

Did you have to edit quite a bit out to transform it from Fantasy to YA?

Louise Marley

Well, technically these books are called YA Fantasy, so they're both. I'm glad you asked this, though

because so many writers think they have to take out anything offensive in order to market books as YA. I had quite a discussion

with my YA editor about this, and she was quite specific that she didn't censor her YA books. The proviso was that any

violence or sexual content had to be necessary to the plot, not egregious (over the top), and that active sexual scenes

take place offstage.

Mary Rosenblum

Did you or your editor have concerns about the book being banned from, say, middle school libraries because of content?

Louise Marley

Oh, I would LOVE to have a banned book! But no, we never did. I don't write a lot of violence or sex or foul language, anyway

although lots of YA novels have all of those things.

rae

It sounds like you write some really cute stories. Was it difficult to go to adult stories after writing for YA audiences?

Mary Rosenblum

You started with adult, right?

Louise Marley

Yes, actually I started with adult. I have to say, it doesn't really feel different to me. I just write about younger characters

but their feelings and the risks and rewards are just as great to them as to older protagonists.

barbiq

What do you think of the recent explosion of great fantasy YA books that have been released in the last couple of years?

Louise Marley

I think it's wonderful, because I know from visiting schools and libraries that these are the books younger readers love.

And I also think there is some great literature in the fantasy field (and science fiction field) and it's finally being recognized.

Mary Rosenblum

Are you doing a lot of school visits?

Louise Marley

I did a lot last year. This year it seems to be libraries! I don't know why these things go in cycles. I love doing YA workshops.

I just did a marvelous one in Boise, Idaho, and the kids were amazing.

stevewingo

Speaking of SINGER IN THE SNOW  Anymore books to be written about Mreen?

Louise Marley

Oh, aren't you a darling to ask! I would love to go on with that story. I can tell you that

the original trilogy is being republished in an omnibus edition in 2009. Maybe that will do well, and I can write more Nevya stories.

h.p. lovesauce

Does 'feminist social science fiction' have a built-in audience, provided one gets the word out?

Louise Marley

I think this subgenre had an audience in the '80's and '90's. I'm not so sure now. It's my favorite genre by far, but

since 2001, audiences have preferred lighter works, and they buy much more fantasy than science fiction. This sort of thing

also goes in cycles, and a writer has to decide how much to simply write what she wants, or when to write something someone will

actually buy! There's a fine line here somewhere.

Mary Rosenblum

Or a personal decision at least. J

Louise Marley

Yes!

charie'

Is there a favorite "age" for your YA characters to be? Why that age?

Louise Marley

Mine are usually a little bit older, in their late teens. I think that's because I have more serious plot lines in mind .

Larkyn, in HORSEMISTRESS SAGA, was my youngest character ever except for Oa, in THE CHILD GODDESS. Well

Oa was actually really, really old, but her bio age was about eleven.

janecj333

When writing YA, I find myself thinking, Would I want my kids to read this (for issues of violence and sexuality)? Usually, it's no. It's a very thin line, I think. How do you deal with it?

Louise Marley

That's a hard one. I think you have to decide what fits your story .

If you're writing about sexual abuse, which is an issue kids have to deal with, or at least be aware of

then you can't get around it. I have to say, though, I never censored my son's reading, and he did fine. If they come to something

that makes them uncomfortable, kids usually just skip past it and go to the stuff they like!

Mary Rosenblum

Speaking of kids

you were collaborating with your son on a book for awhile. How did that turn out?

Louise Marley

I'm still working on that book! it's the work-in-progress. Zack is my plot adviser, but he's very busy with his band and his job at the moment.

Mary Rosenblum

Is that one a YA or adult?

Louise Marley

It's very, very adult. J A stretch for me!

andipandi10

What advice do you have for someone just breaking into YA fiction?

Louise Marley

Write a great book! That sounds so patronizing, but that's always the best way to break in and stay in.

leave no stone unturned! I work with a writer's group, I confer with my agent, I study and get advice

all the things you're doing right here on this rather wonderful website.

Mary Rosenblum

From what I see, the YA market is predominantly a novel market. Is that your perception, too?

Louise Marley

It does seem to be. There's a small market for short YA fiction, but most of the stories seem to come from novelists.

gail

Are plot-lines and themes any less complex for YA fiction?

Louise Marley

I think they are, a bit, but it's determined more by length than by a wish to simplify for the sake of younger readers. A novel of

60,000 words can't have too many subplots. It should have some, though!

Themes are different, I think, but not less complex.

Mary Rosenblum

Did you make any conscious stylistic choices when you were writing YA rather than adult? Less internal narrative, less description, anything like that?

Louise Marley

I really didn't. Stylistically, my style is probably recognizable from book to book, whether adult or YA. I think I don't

do a lot of internal narrative in any case, and I like my prose "lean and mean"--that works well for shorter novels.

Mary Rosenblum

Your Toby Bishop novels involve flying horses as major characters. And I was really pleased with your 'horse verisimilitude'. How much research did you do to get your horses

right and especially, the flying part!

Louise Marley

I'm glad an animal expert like you found them believable! And yes, my flying horses are characters in themselves, with

personalities and characteristics all their own. I know a lot about horses, but I read everything I could find to refresh and expand

my knowledge. For flying, I combined a knowledge of birds (from my mom) and airplanes (from my husband)

and then I worked with my niece, who rode jumpers, to figure out a believable way for a horse to take off and land. It was

a lot of information to combine into something more or less straightforward. I had to reach a point where

I believed it myself, and then it seemed to work.

Mary Rosenblum

And your horses don’t have feathered wings, do they? Isn’t that what I remember?

Louise Marley

They have membranous wings, like bats. I'll tell you all a secret, that's not in the books:

the winged horses of Oc are actually descended from dinosaurs. Think pterodactyls!

Mary Rosenblum

Must have made the cover artist reach for the antacids!

Louise Marley

He did a nice job of the wings. Funny story there

at the last minute Zack said, "Be sure to remind your editor there are no feathers, so she can tell the artist"

and when I did, she said, OMG, I'm glad you reminded me!

Mary Rosenblum

Had he already sketched out feathery wings?

Louise Marley

I'm not sure, but my editor thought that could have happened. They don't always read our manuscripts, Mary, do they?

Mary Rosenblum

I wish! Actually, I HAVE been lucky, but I sure know those who were not!

Louise Marley

Even with the good job Allen Douglas did

it's hard to picture how a rider would sit on his winged horse.

Mary Rosenblum

So Louise, can we talk a bit about the process of writing a book how YOU do it?

Louise Marley

Sure! It would be interesting to know how we differ.

Mary Rosenblum

Where do you start?

Idea?

Character

Louise Marley

Image!

Mary Rosenblum

Oh, cool! Always?

Louise Marley

Usually I have a picture in my mind--say a winged horse--and I start thinking about what the story is behind it.  Then I just jump in. I write three chapters--what Madeleine L'Engle called "writing myself into the book" and then I stop, ponder everything, and write a synopsis. I would hate to set off on a whole book without knowing the ending.

rae

What do you mean "image"?

Louise Marley

Rae, the image can be something as vague as a setting--the ice world of Nevya, for example--or something really specific.

Mary Rosenblum

How thorough is your synopsis?

Louise Marley

My synopses are not too long

they tend to run twelve to eighteen pages, just a rough outline of what might happen. I often don't refer to them while I'm writing,

but they do help me to structure a book. It's a big project to hold in your mind all at one time!

Well, my mind, in any case.

rae

I am an artist, and sometimes I will draw a character, then come back and write a story to go with that character. Is that what you mean?

Louise Marley

That would work really well for me--if I could draw at all!

For example

when I wrote my first novel, SING THE LIGHT, I had this picture in my mind of a young Singer in a Conservatory, with nothing but snow and ice and

deadly cold all around . I just had to figure out how she got there, what was going on, what the backstory was

and what her problem was!

Mary Rosenblum

This is like starting with the book cover. JCool way to begin.

Louise Marley

I've heard some people start with an intriguing sentence that gets them thinking.

Once I started with a title!

lottiemae

How much of the synopsis is about the book?

Mary Rosenblum

And how much is about the world?

Louise Marley

The synopsis is entirely about the book. I write mine as if I were telling a friend a story--nothing fancy, no elaboration, just

this happens and then this happens, and then this

World building and character development happen for me as I write more than in the synopsis. That's because

for me those are the easier parts. Plot is hard. Really, really, really hard. Sigh.

Mary Rosenblum

What about the world building for your SF and fantasy worlds. You do it as you write the story? Not ahead?

Louise Marley

I do some of it ahead, but some of it only comes to me as I realize what I need to know to go forward. That's probably

not the best way to do it, but it's the way my mind works. Before that, everything is visual. Usually!

charie'

How do you organize your research notes? Details about the world you've created?

Louise Marley

I create files on my computer, and copy everything there. I also have a completely disorganized "Notes" file, in which I just

write everything I think of that I need to include, or want to think about. Other people are better organized, I think.

I also have a Chapter Map so I can go back to certain places without having to search through the entire novel.

Mary Rosenblum

What do you include in your chapter map?

Louise Marley

It's pretty simple: Chapter One: character X gets on the ship and flies to Mars. Chapter Two: character Y leaves Mars and flies to Earth .

It's just what happens in what order so I can keep the structure in my mind.

rae

Please, be sure to print copies of what you have on the computer. Crashes are very bad things. :-(

Louise Marley

Oh. Good reminder. I lost a hard drive once, and lost several days of work. These days I copy onto a flash drive

and onto a thumb drive, and whenever I travel, I leave one of those safely at home!

charie'

Do you have the Chapter Map based on your synopsis?

Louise Marley

No, my synopsis is straightforward narrative, in the present tense, and usually not separated into sections at all. It's really

not a very sophisticated document! Although when I sell a book on proposal, I try to polish it up a bit so it won't offend my editor.

The important thing about the synopsis is knowing where I'm going at the end of the book.

sundale

Any advice on making sure your world isn't using things too advanced for them? (i.e. Medieval guys wielding swords they'd never be able to make back then)

Louise Marley

This is a research question, and yes, I've learned a lot about finding sources for information! . . .

The internet is a great tool, of course, and there are forums where people who know stuff are eager to share. (You just have to

double-check in case they're wrong.) I also have a fabulous book I use called

ENGLISH THROUGH THE AGES. This book tells me when certain words came into use. It's great for.

using the right words for historical stories, but also for knowing when certain things became available. There's actually

tons of information to be found on the Medieval Period. The public library is the greatest resource ever.

I once found a book of Medieval recipes!

andipandi10

Any suggestions on researching a first-time fantasy story?

Louise Marley

First, you'll need to decide if you need research. Fantasy can take place in a completely invented world, of course. Not all fantasies

take place in a medieval Earth-like world. But if you do need to do research

I would start at the library. Find the section you want, and if you can't, ask the librarians there. They love to help, and they

usually know just what you need. The thing about research is

that you can spend all your time doing that, and none writing the story! My rule is

I look it up when I need it, and not before. And when I've found what I need, I STOP, and go back to the book.

info

In writing out chapter maps and deciding what you want in each chapter, do you find that something sometimes needs to be in a previous chapter or in a later chapter?

Mary Rosenblum

Do you shuffle things around much during revision?

Louise Marley

Actually, my chapter map comes after I've written the chapter. And yes, sometimes things do need to be moved around, but usually

I have the sequence pretty firmly in my mind. Rules are different for every project! I think that's one reason writing is hard

especially novels, because of the length and the scope.

Mary Rosenblum

But you have that early synopsis, right? That probably helps you get the basic plot arc down.

Louise Marley

That's the purpose it serves. If you know where you're going, even though your path might diverge here and there, you save a

lot of backtracking and tossing out of material. It's kind of like a trip across country . . . you may take side trips, but

your destination is clear.

The thing about synopses is

if you feel you have to stick to it exactly, you might miss out on a really interesting bit of plot development!

sundale

When your story does something you didn't plan, do you usually go with the flow, or change it back?

Louise Marley

I subscribe to the Connie Willis rule, that my characters do what I tell them to do. However

sometimes a really great idea comes along that I didn't plan. What a waste not to use it! As long as

it isn't such a huge side trip that I can't get back on track, I can indulge myself.

Mary Rosenblum

As long as it serves the story?

Louise Marley

Exactly. Once, for example

I hadn

hadn't intended

for a character to die, but his death made the story so intense, and the stakes so much higher, that

I just had to do it. it was the right choice for the story. (Hard on him, though.)

gail

Did you write your first novel with thoughts of its place in a series, or did that come later?

Louise Marley

I'm afraid with my first novel I hadn't a clue what I was doing! I learned on the fly, as it were. And then.

I looked around and realized that fantasies like the one I had written were being sold in threes, so I proposed a trilogy

to my agent, and he sold it that way. One finished book, two not yet written.

It's great if you know ahead of time, because you can sow the seeds

of a really interesting and more complex uber-plot that will cover the whole series. I did that with THE HORSEMISTRESS SAGA. I knew it would be a trilogy, so I had three shorter story arcs and one long, three-book one.

Mary Rosenblum

And often publishers will ask you to do proposals for more books if they think it will work as a series.

zave

Do you have a series you'd like to continue for a while?

Louise Marley

Yes, I'd love to write more in THE HORSEMISTRESS SAGA. And also THE SINGERS OF NEVYA! You know how it is

you fall in love with your characters and your world and you keep wanting to go back there.

I'd also love to write another novel in the world of THE TERRORISTS OF IRUSTAN and THE CHILD GODDESS.

freda

What drew you into writing or have you always wanted to?

Louise Marley

I wanted to write when I was younger, but then my musical career occupied me for a long time! It was great to revisit an early ambition.

stevewingo

Any suggestions for me..er those of us who have a hard time staying with the same tense when we write?

Louise Marley

It's okay to decide you've chosen the wrong tense! If you thought it should be a past tense story and then you decide

it should be present, you just have to be careful to change all the verbs. If you sort of waffle in and out, catch it on rewrite!

Mary Rosenblum

How many revisions do you normally do for a project?

Louise Marley

I'm a big fan of reading work aloud, too. That exposes a lot of faults we don't see on the page.

I rewrite a bazillion times.

It's my favorite part of the job.

So I guess I would say, one big revision, but many, many small ones.

Mary Rosenblum

On your 'big revision' you focus on ?

Louise Marley

The big revision is the one for errors in logic, facts, consistency, and --erg--timelines, a big problem for me. I try to begin

at the beginning of the novel and go straight through so I have a good sense of structure, pace, and tension. All along I've been

polishing and changing and rewriting this and that. After the big revision, I usually do at least one more complete pass, or maybe

more if something doesn't feel right to me. it's a lot! none of this write it fast and send it out stuff for me!

lottiemae

How long does it take you to write a novel?

Louise Marley

It's funny that I can actually answer that question! I've normally taken about eighteen months to write a big novel, as in a science

fiction novel. I wrote my YA in a year, and each of the Toby Bishop books took a year. But the work-in-progress is back on that

eighteen-month schedule. Some people write much, much faster, of course. And I know one or two who are slower.

Mary Rosenblum

You have a regular writers group, right?

Louise Marley

I have a wonderful writers' group. All of us are actively publishing fantasy and science fiction, and the level of critique

is incredible. I wish you lived closer to us, Mary!

Mary Rosenblum

Ah, me, too!

So you feel that a writers group or good readers are a good thing, I take it?

Louise Marley

for me, essential. My first reader is my son, who's so very good at it. And then I try to have at least two other

writer friends read a manuscript before I send it out. One of them is great at technical details, and the other reads for the big picture.

Mary Rosenblum

And you take their comments seriously, I take it?

Louise Marley

Now, that's a good question. I take them seriously, yes. But every bit of input, even from an editor, in my opinion must be filtered

through my own viewpoint. In the end, of course, it's my book, and I have to decide what's the best way to go with it. Don't you think so?

Mary Rosenblum

Absolutely.

Critiques are informed opinions.

Louise Marley

Right!

Mary Rosenblum

Sometimes very 'right on'. Sometimes the critiquer reads a different story.

As you say, it's your book.

Louise Marley

And my editor says the same.

charie'

Is it better to have all three books in a series written and then try to get them published?

Louise Marley

That's a hard one. For me, in planning a trilogy, I'd rather sell it after writing the first book. It's a lot of work--and emotional energy--

to write a whole series and then possibly not sell it!

But we do whatever we have to do. There's no blueprint, unfortunately.

Mary Rosenblum

If a publisher likes the first book, even if you're a novice writer

they'll take proposals for the next two.

Louise Marley

Right. That's what happened for me. They do want to know you can at least finish one novel, though. Surprising how many people

find that impossible.

k c morlock

Do you experience lags in writing, you know what you are writing to, but don't know how to get there and keep the reader engaged? Do you write through the bridge work or do you have another technique?

Louise Marley

Of course I do. I hope that's normal! (if there is a normal) I find the middles of books the hardest, and then I remember

Connie Willis's brilliant advice. Reversals are great ways to get your plot going if it has lagged a bit! . . .

That means, cause more trouble for your characters!

kard

How soon after writing do you have critiquers read what you've written?

Louise Marley

I always rewrite before submitting to critiquers. First draft stuff is just too rough.

Actually, in my group we read aloud, and I love that. it reveals so much.

Mary Rosenblum

That's very nice if you have the time. You REALLY hear rough spots that way.

Louise Marley

Yes. There's an immediacy to it that I find helpful.

sundale

I too go through long term lulls. I find the best way to get through them is to keep thinking about the story, and let the blockage dissolve.

Louise Marley

Seat of the pants to the seat of the chair. For me, the biggest thing is to eliminate distractions . . .

when things get tough, it's easy to go do something else, and I have to resist that tendency.

k c morlock

Who is Connie Willis?

Louise Marley

Connie Willis may be the greatest living sf writer. Okay, maybe that's a bit excessive, but she's a fabulous novelist and also

brilliant at the short form. She does hard science, history, and humor. And she's the best teacher of writing I've ever met.

Can you tell I like her? I've read everything--and I mean EVERYTHING--she's written.

Mary Rosenblum

And an hysterically funny speaker! I have injured myself laughing!

Louise Marley

Me, too. I never miss a chance to hear her or talk to her.

rae

She is with Random House. Would you say they are the best?

Louise Marley

She's published with several different publishers. Random House is good, of course, and big. At the moment

I'm finding some of the "best" publishers are midsize houses, like Pyr.

It's all about the editors and the art departments--and then the sales departments--and then

there's just no way to quantify which publishers are the best, I guess!

rae

How many years have you been a writer?

Louise Marley

My first book came out in 1995, and I began writing about four years before that. So, let's see . . . seventeen years!

lottiemae

So after writing the novel, what is next? Publisher, copyright..?

Louise Marley

When your book is finished, you have to decide whether to submit to publishers yourself

or get an agent first. These days, I think it works better to find an agent. You don't need to worry about

copyright. When your book is sold, the copyright is established under your contract. And there are lots of ways to find

good agents, beginning with the Assoc. of Authors Representatives.

Mary Rosenblum

(And ALWAYS make sure the agent is a member of AAR!!!)

Louise Marley

Oh, good. I should have said that!

Lots of scammers out there, sadly.

And please remember

money comes TO the author. Not FROM. Never.

Mary Rosenblum

http://www.aar-online.org/index.html Association of Authors' Representative homepage

Louise Marley

They don't allow fee-charging agents. Agents make money by selling your work.

Mary Rosenblum

So, Louise, before we run out of time, let's hear about what you're doing! What's out what will be out when what are you working on that we can watch for?

Louise Marley

The work-in-progress is still only half done, so I can't even give an idea about that. But AIRS OF NIGHT AND SEA will be coming in

December, and then the omnibus edition of THE SINGERS OF NEVYA will be out in 2009. AIRS is Toby Bishop, of course

and NEVYA is Louise Marley. I recently published a short story collection, too, called ABSALOM'S MOTHER.

And I'm still promoting SINGER IN THE SNOW, in paperback.

Mary Rosenblum

Isn't Absalom's Mother out from Fairwood Press?

Louise Marley

Yes! You have books with Fairwood, too, don't you?

Mary Rosenblum

Yes, Water Rites.

Louise Marley

Great book. I could hardly put it down.

Mary Rosenblum

Thanks. J

Louise Marley

Fairwood is a small press in Washington State

and they're doing wonderful work, high quality stuff in smaller quantities.

Mary Rosenblum

Do you have any new images that might turn into books? Or will that happen after you finish with the AIRS series?

And Patrick Swenson  of Fairwood Press was my last guest here.

Louise Marley

I'm so deep into the work-in-progress that there's hardly room in my mind for anything else. I can't wait to be able to talk about it .

I feel a little superstitious!

Mary Rosenblum

We won' t pry!

Ah, Zave has a great final question for you!

Louise Marley

Hey, Zave. Let's have it.

zave

What to you is the most important thing about writing?

Louise Marley

Gosh. A hard final question. You know, I think the most important thing is the work itself. I love . . .

Louise Marley

actually writing. I love it when words come together well, I love that flow when everything's working well, and I love

Louise Marley

making characters and worlds come to life. It's good to be business-like, of course

Louise Marley

but when all's said and done, this is art. And art has to be its own reward. IMHO.

Mary Rosenblum

I think that's very well said, Louise!

Louise Marley

Not everyone agrees with me.

Mary Rosenblum

Thank you so much for being a great guest and sharing a LOT of very useful insights into  fantasy, YA, and writing with us.

Louise Marley

It was great fun, and great questions!

Mary Rosenblum

So how are you enjoying being a LR instructor?

Louise Marley

I love it. I have such talented students, and they're so full of energy. I'm proud of the course, too.

Mary Rosenblum

Thanks so much for being here tonight! I know you're busy and I know you have writing to do!

We'll let you go and I'll certainly ask you back again! Maybe when the final AIRS is published.

Louise Marley

We all do. Everyone get to work! :J

Mary Rosenblum

Good advice!

Louise Marley

That would be lovely.

Mary Rosenblum

Thank you all for coming tonight and I hope you all have a lovely spring weekend!

Good night, Louise, and thanks!

Louise Marley

'Bye all!'

Mary Rosenblum

Good night, all!

Write well!

 

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