Interview Transcripts

Mary Rosenblum: SF and Mystery Writer, LR Web Editor and Instructor 5/4/06

Event start time:

Thu May 04 19:01:31 2006

Event end time:

Thu May 04 21:05:02 2006



Legend:
Questions from the Audience are presented in red.
Answers by the Speaker are in black.
The Moderator's comments are in blue.

 

 

 

Mary Rosenblum first published in Asimov's Magazine in 1990 with 'For A Price', one of her Clarion West stories. Since that first publication, she has published more than 60 short stories in SF, mystery, and mainstream fiction, as well as three SF novels, The Drylands, Chimera, and Stone Garden. Her new novel, Horizon, will be out in November from Tor Books, and her Analog story 'Skin Deep' has been included in the 'Year's Best SF' for 2005. Her SF stories have been published in Asimov's, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, SciFiction, and Analog among others. She won the Compton Crook award for Best First Novel, The Asimov's Readers Award, and has been a Hugo Award finalist. She has also published a mystery series and publishes mystery short stories as Mary Freeman.

 

She lives in the Pacific Northwest. When she is not writing, she trains dogs in tracking, sheep herding, and obedience work and grows all her fruits and vegetables and some sheep on country acreage. You can find more information at her website: www.maryrosenblum.com

Jean Lauzier

Welcome all...and do please be patient...

xana

Have you used your experience in dog training and sheep rearing in any of your books?

Jean Lauzier

There...finally figured out the right button:--)

Mary Rosenblum

Takes a moment. J

 

I have, actually, xana. I have a story in the June issue of Ellery Queen called Back Track

 

that includes tracking Rottweilers...the second story in Ellery Queen with those characters. I don't think I’ve used sheep shearing yet

 

but I probably will. I use whatever experience I have as much as I can. :-) Write what you know.

Jean Lauzier

I've noticed you use a lot of what you know in your writing....what other things have you used?

Mary Rosenblum

Oh, gosh, I use personal experience all the time in odd ways.

 

I've used experience slaughtering livestock to create realistic fights and wounds and deaths,

 

scuba experience to describe flight or the life of a sub sea human.

 

Every moment of my life is potentially useful....memories of falling off a rock face to give my character realistic moments of terror as he falls... That sort of thing.

gskearney

How did you come to be associated with LRWG?

Mary Rosenblum

Oh, that's SUCH a cool story!

 

I got invited to come do a reading at an arts festival up in White Salmon, Washington. The woman who ran the festival

 

approached me afterward and told me about LR. She was an ICL instructor. She thought I'd be great and offered to tell them about me.

 

I was VERY ambivalent, LOL. I had friends who had taught for Writers Digest Schools and I was NOT impressed...didn't want to be associated with something like that.

 

But she convinced me it was a good school, and when they contacted me and sent me course materials and so forth I was REALLY impressed.

 

The rest is history. :-)

Jean Lauzier

So how long have you been an instructor with LR?

Mary Rosenblum

Hmm... I think five years this fall?

xana

How many students does an RWG teacher have at any given time?

Mary Rosenblum

I have a little over 200 Xana. Which sounds like a LOT, but it really isn't. I do maybe 20 student ms in a week. I know all my students personally

 

in terms of who they are, what their strengths are, and as much of their personal lives as they choose to share with me. Some have become long time friends.

Jean Lauzier

What do you like most about being an instructor?

Mary Rosenblum

Oh, two things. First I love working with aspiring writers. I remember vividly being at that stage

 

and I really try to reach back and hand off some of what I've learned by...sometimes bitter...experience. J Secondly

 

I LOVE working with the variety of fiction and non that I work with. You really learn a lot about your craft when you have to help someone improve a story

 

that is very different than what you write. It has grown me as a writer.

xana

What do you like least?

Mary Rosenblum

Well, let's face it, there are some lovely summer days when I would really rather be out in the garden, but hey, I feel that way about my own writing at times. J

Jean Lauzier

Lore mentioned today about the "magical moment when you feel like a writer". Did you always feel like a writer and if not, when did you?

Mary Rosenblum

Well, no I didn't always feel like a writer. I got told by a very trusted English teacher that 'writers are born' and gently discouraged.

 

I believed her a lot more than I should have!

 

I had already been retelling

 

stories since I could read, making up my won (daydreaming my teachers called it and routinely gave me a C in Citizenship in grade school)

 

and even writing some down. It wasn't until many years later, when I found I could easily write and sell nonfiction

 

that I thought 'why not try fiction?'

 

but it took me until long after I was published to 'wake up'. About the tenth time someone used the word 'talented new writer' in conjunction

 

with my name it hit me ...I was in my basement at the time, doing laundry...that I WAS a talented new writer. Sheesh. Slow learning curve here.

Jean Lauzier

I know you have a new novel coming out soon...and I have some novel questions here. How about telling us about Horizons?

Mary Rosenblum

Horizon is the first really 'big' book I've written...I've tended to be a short story writer even when

 

those short stories are 380 pages long, lol.

 

It's complex, has several interwoven plot threads, a lot of character interactions, and I manage to sneak in a few

 

of my usual socio-political statements.

 

I LOVED writing it. J

janecj333

Did you use an agent to market your SF novel, Horizon, to Tor?

 

And is it the same agent you've used in the past for SF?

Mary Rosenblum

Oh, yes, I'm stuck with Martha forever and vice versa. She's a very good agent and your agent handles EVERYTHING you write (novel length)

 

unless you agree otherwise. And no, Martha wasn't my first agent query.

 

I got turned down by a few, even with my track record at the time, had one who dumped me rather nastily (found out later he had just found out...

 

he was dying of AIDS, so I guess he was entitled), and then got picked up by Martha.

geezer

So a big book has several plots and doesn't necesarily mean a long novel?

Mary Rosenblum

Yeah...the book weighs in at just over 100,000 words. 'Big' has to do with the size of the issues involved and the complexity of the plot.

charie'

How many combined ideas do you need to start one story?

Mary Rosenblum

Hmmm...well I usually start with one, and then I keep adding to that until I feel that I have the right

 

mix of 'external' issues and character issues, big and small. Then I go for it. I just reached that stage with the next novel.

 

It was lacking a big issue and I finally figured one out.

Jean Lauzier

Do you sometimes find those big issues by researching?

Mary Rosenblum

Oh yeah...I skim everything that I can get my hands on in a wiiiide range of fields and when

 

something catches my attention I pursue it. Latest example...wasps as 'sniffers' for disease. They are MUCH better than dogs.

Jean Lauzier

Now that is interesting.

xana

Which book has been your most successful, and why do you think it became so?

Mary Rosenblum

In SF, Chimera was my most successful and cause of some bad blood between Del Rey and myself

 

or rather Random House since they made the decision not to run multiple printings of it, the butts!

 

And I think

 

it was popular because I really did the science well on virtual reality where most writers were using it as magic

 

and I had some charismatic characters.

 

It got me called a 'cyber humanist' as opposed to 'cyber punk'. LOL

mephistopheles

Have you ever been trashed in a review and considered that you may have bitten off more than you can chew? How did you rebound from the rejection?

Mary Rosenblum

I've gotten amazingly wonderful reviews, actually mephis. The worst I've gotten are some 'excellent writing, not as outstanding as usual', so I can HARDLY complain! But I've certainly

 

had plenty of rejections! Gordon over at F&SF just bounced the SF story I sent him.

 

Hardly a new thing, LOL

Jean Lauzier

And how do you handle those rejections? Chop wood...haul manure?

Mary Rosenblum

Oh worse than that. Swear. Comment at length on the editor's lineage, mode of birth, DNA, personal habits...then I get mad,

 

write a better story, and sell it to someone else. JThen I feel better. Meanwhile, I send THAT story out elsewhere. (This one to Asimov's)

jyinxy

Through your years writing what has been your biggest motivator? What keeps you going when you find yourself asking "Am I crazy. I'll never finish this! Or do this?"

Mary Rosenblum

Sigh. I simply cannot stop, jyinxy. I don't feel good when I'm not writing. Nothing else makes me feel the way writing feels.

 

I have tried to quit numerous times. Who in their right mind works this hard for so little money? Can't do it.

xana

Have you ever used a rejecting editor as a character in a story?

Mary Rosenblum

Nah. I've never put anyone in one of my stories. People have done that and in one memorable instance

 

everybody in the SF universe knew who the woman was. I thought it was highly unethical and my respect for the author decreased.

janecj333

Random House must have based their decision on sales (the bottom line). So, how do you go about getting a different publisher to do a reprint?

Mary Rosenblum

You get more famous, jane. J Fairwood Press is bringing Chimera out this year, soon after Horizon hits the shelves.  Yes,

 

all sales decisions are based on numbers...however, in that case (the reason for the bad feelings on my part)

 

Chimera's numbers were very good. It was a policy decision about publishing less SF that season and it had a negative impact on my sales figures

 

as a new writer.

 

Happens. Not a 'fair' business.

paminnapa

Sorry was late not sure if asked already......As people become more and more attached to the  computer and most kids spend way more time in front of TV/electronics and less time reading, do you think its going to be harder to get a book published?

Mary Rosenblum

No and yes. It's EASY to get a book published since the technology is getting so cheap.

 

You have the vanity presses like iUniverse and Publish America...but the profit margin for the big

 

houses is getting very squeezed. They make lousy business decisions. I think we're going to see a huge shakedown in publishing over the next decade.

xana

But it isn't fair to compare sales for a novel not advertised to one where a lot of money was spent on promotion

Mary Rosenblum

Ha, Xana, I WISH my publisher would spend big bucks on advertising. HA! It's not advertising, Xana, that makes

 

the difference, it's distribution. My recent books sold about 35,000 copies each.... They were

 

in every B&N, Crowne, and independent bookstore  in the country.

gskearney

Will you put up something on your site, so we can order signed copies of Horizon?? Please, with sugar and honey on it (The request not the book.)

Mary Rosenblum

Well, I don't think I dare do that or the complications of shipping books is going to eat ALL my writing time! (And my PO is a dinosaur anyway). BUT...I'll offer signed bookplates for a SASE. How's that?

Jean Lauzier

Horizons can be preordered at amazon.com right?

gskearney

Super!  

Mary Rosenblum

Yep. I'm a totally mercenary creature and there's a link on the website page, right next to the cover. I guess amazon.com is getting quite a few preorders, which is way cool!

janecj333

Can you tell us the print run for Chimera at Random House, and is it similar to the print run for Horizons?

Mary Rosenblum

Oh, Horizon will be out in hardcover first, so the first print run won't be that large...I'd have to go pull out my contracts to tell you.

 

They'll reprint if needed. The mass market paperback will be out a year later and in much larger numbers.

Jean Lauzier

Will any of your other novels be coming back out?

Mary Rosenblum

Yes, I've had several queries from small press houses. A friend of mine (and fellow writer) runs Scorpio Digital and we’ve talked about bringing out my first, Drylands, along with the three

 

Asimov's novelettes that created the main characters. I'd love to have an ebook out and

 

she does lovely stuff, so hopefully it’ll happen.

megger

My book club just finished "The Woman in White." Having multiple POVs telling huge chunks of the story was an interesting format and one I don't see much of in today's authors. Is there a reason for that?

Mary Rosenblum

Yeah...it's hard to make it work well, and most writers can't pull it off without

 

distancing the reader to the point it doesn't engage.

gskearney

How did you like the cover for Horizon? I had a few issues with the way it looks, but it's hard to tell from the pictures I've seen exactly what it's supposed to represent.

Mary Rosenblum

Well, let's face it, the 'New York' stuck on each end of the platform are entirely the author's doing. :-) But it is SO hard to make a spinning tin can look sexy that I didn't even grumble. The cover design is

 

lovely and I'm not going to gripe. It'll give me something to talk about at every con. J

 

They'll tweak it a bit before it goes to press, by the way.

Jean Lauzier

How is cover art decided on? Does the writer have any say in the matter at all?

Mary Rosenblum

Nah, none. Cover horror stories are favorite 'bar conversations'. Connie Willis lost a lot of sales once

 

from a very unfortunate cover. I've been VERY lucky and have liked all my covers. The artist for Horizon,  John Harris, had the art director

 

call me and ask what the platform looked like.

xana

My friend, Charlene Weir, hates some of the book covers her books were stuck with

Mary Rosenblum

Many authors do. You got NO say in it.

kashmir

Who is your favorite author to read?

Mary Rosenblum

Oh, Lord, I'm a dud at this question. I've never had a favorite author. I like this aspect of this writer's work

 

that aspect of that author's.

 

I actually read mostly mainstream these days.

Jean Lauzier

Are there any writers that have had a direct influence on your writing?

Mary Rosenblum

Oh, gosh, many!

 

You know, the list would be enormous.

 

Bradbury was a big one...Kate Wilhelm...Octavia Butler…

 

You should see my library...you can measure it in 'cords' like wood.

Jean Lauzier

Sweet sent me this question earlier. What is the strangest thing you have done in the name of research?

Mary Rosenblum

Wooo...I'd have to think. We'll stick to legal, okay? J Hmmm...I think beheaded a goat, actually.

 

It's really not as sick as it sounds...

 

I used to slaughter my wethers for meat, and I disbelieved the bone-slicing sword play I kept reading

 

so a friend of mine who has a high rank in Judo and does swords, aided me in my butchering task.

Mary Rosenblum

I don't know who was more shocked...him or me...at how CLEANLY that sword did the job. I stood corrected!

gskearney

Speaking as an old goat myself, I'd have to say it sounds pretty sick to me.

Mary Rosenblum

(And I will NEVER face someone with a sword in hand, nosirreee)

 

LOL gary, believe me its a painless way to die.

Jean Lauzier

You have mentioned attending the Clarion Writer's Workshop. Do you recommend workshops for aspiring writers?

Mary Rosenblum

Yes. There are a wide range of workshops out there, and it's a great way

 

to get a lot of intense feedback in a short space of time and also make some long time friends.

 

Right, Charie? She went to Clarion West with me. J

ashton

Hi, Mary! What would be the strongest piece of advice you'd give aspiring authors? And what was the worst piece of advice YOU were given?

Mary Rosenblum

The worst piece of advice I've ever gotten was from that aforementioned English teacher who told me writers were born and I’d never be one.

 

I wish I had her address...my collection of books and magazines with stuff by me in them covers about 6 feet of bookshelf space. I could send her a set, collect freight, lol.

 

The strongest piece I’ve given an aspiring writer? Hmmm... Go send this off!!! NOW! I don't CARE.

ashton

Goes to show that if you want something bad enough nothing will stop you but yourself...We are all glad you didn't listen to that teacher. Look at all the people you've helped and inspired through the years.

Mary Rosenblum

Well, I should have not listened to her sooner!!! I was over 30 when I finally started doing this and applied to Clarion.

 

But I guess I needed to grow up some.

Jean Lauzier

As a single mom with two small sons, the animals, garden and other things, how did you balance then and find the time to write?

Mary Rosenblum

You know, my busy life is not accidental. J  I intentionally stay busy because it makes me a better writer. If I have tons of time

 

I sit in front of the screen and can't think may way out of this dead end, I butt my head against the same brick wall.

 

But if writing time is precious, I don't do that. I go do the stuff I have to do and the right brain has time to work. When I can't STAND it anymore

 

I throw everything aside, sit down and write until I run out of words. Which is 15 minutes to 12 hours later.

janp

Maybe that teacher did you a favor--jump started you :-)

Mary Rosenblum

And lo! The problem is solved.

 

Well, the teacher really didn't do ANYTHING to me. You have to have the desire to write and it has to be strong

 

enough to overcome your self doubts. I don't think I could have overcome my self doubts if I had started at 19 or 20.

 

I could a decade later.

paja

What was the pivotal moment of decision to apply to Clarion?

Mary Rosenblum

I had been thinking about it, but when I saw that Orson Scott Card was going to be there as well as Gardner Dozois, editor of Asimov's, I decided NOW!  That was a huge undertaking. I had to

Mary Rosenblum

get the money and find someone to take care of my sons for 6 weeks! I had just read Enders Game by Card, and loved it

xana

And you have to overcome your self doubt and fear of failure

Mary Rosenblum

Well, xana, in that case, I jumped off that particular cliff before I had a chance to doubt. J

Jean Lauzier

This was from a bit ago but isn't the fear and doubts something we all have to overcome?

Mary Rosenblum

It is the thing all writers have in common, and it is the reason a lot of talented people never submit or publish.

 

I'm not entirely free of 'em, I just know their names and call 'em by them.

info

Do you ever find that there are people out there, whether it be fan or novice writers, who follow you around and look at you as if you were at or near 'god' status? If so, how do you handle it?

Mary Rosenblum

Oh, lordy, yes. Sigh. :-) Who's going to deny that it's not flattering? But it's rather dangerous to 'listen' to that. :-) I see that happen at the cons, all the time.

 

But it occasionally does get annoying.

charie'

You need passion to write well. Even if it's from anger. lol

Jean Lauzier

How important do you think passion is in our writing?

Mary Rosenblum

Oh, no kidding! You said it there, charie!

 

I think it's critical, Jean. You have to care a LOT about what you are saying....

 

You have to BELIEVE that this book is really good, that people want to read it, that it will touch readers in the same

 

way books have touched you. If you do, that is the energy that readers will feel.

ashton

That's a scary thought...guess that's why you should consider a pen name if you aren't up to such hype?

Mary Rosenblum

Well, actually, you've put your finger on something ash. It shocked me...really shocked me...when I realized that a LOT of people

Jean Lauzier

Any thoughts on pen names?

Mary Rosenblum

had read my stories and made judgments about who I was as a person. Frequently wrong judgments...but they thought they KNEW me, they felt we were friends in a way

 

and I had never met them. It was kind of spooky at first. Doesn't bother me now. (And I DO live with three Rotts).

 

As to pen names

 

that's up to you. I love it that people know who I am. J I use Freeman so readers can instantly

 

know if it's mystery or SF/fantasy/mainstream.

 

If you want personal privacy, use a pen name.

xana

I've used several to go with different writing persona, and I'm in good company - Mark Twain

Mary Rosenblum

Oh yeah...lots of writers have one name per genre.

 

It's also a good move in the 'numbers' business of publishing. J

Jean Lauzier

Any negatives with using pen names?

Mary Rosenblum

Sure. Nobody recognizes you in the restaurant. LOL

 

Other than that, no.

codeblue

What if your all is there and then just shot full of holes

Jean Lauzier

This came in when we were talking about passion. Any advice?

Mary Rosenblum

Write something better next time, code. My 'all' has been in every story I've written. They didn't all get published. Code, you're not a well

 

with a finite volume, and you don't have 'one masterwork' in you that you'll do and then never do again. When you get shot down, get mad, call

 

the creeps the names they deserve for not appreciating you, and then write something that'll really show the so-and-sos.

 

You'll get better every time, trust me.

Jean Lauzier

In your time as a LR instructor, you've seen a lot of students come and go. What is the main difference you see between those do well and publish and those who don't?

Mary Rosenblum

ONE thing. Desire.

 

Every student I have had so far who REALLY wanted to get published....has.

 

Maybe not during the course, but I get letters later on.

ashton

Well, it scares me, Mary. I've dealt a little with what you were saying when it comes to my paintings...people wanting just to "touch" me. Made me laugh inside, but gave me the creeps too. There are so many nuts out there...and it seems even worse when you live in a small community where everyone knows you.

Mary Rosenblum

Well, it's true...anything you do that makes you stand out...makes you stand out. If that's a scary thought, use a pen name. The publishers won't reveal it.

janecj333

Maybe it's not the better story,  just that you have more out there. By the law of averages, with fifty stories sent out the chances of getting one published is better than if only 10.

Mary Rosenblum

Nah, it's the better story, Jane. Believe me, I've read slush, I read LR submissions. When one is good it just shines...when one is close, editors pay attention.

 

Most are really poor, and then you have a layer that are technically good but not outstanding.

xana

10 good stories have a better chance than 50 bad ones

Mary Rosenblum

Or 50 mediocre ones, you're so right, xana.

ashton

Have you ever had to fail a student?

Mary Rosenblum

Yeah, I have. He really shouldn't have been accepted to the course. I read his test and I suspect he got someone to do it for him.

info

I have a sister in law who seems to look at me as someone on a pedestal and I find it very eerie to say the least and I'm not even published yet not to mentioned not showing her any of my work. Makes me wonder if it would be worse once I am published.

ashton

How do editors/publishers keep track of people who are up and coming? You said they'll remember you....do they like jot your name down in a file or record you in their memory banks for stories you'll send 'em in the future?

Mary Rosenblum

Well, info, it really won't unless you're at a conference or you're on the bestseller list. :-) I doubt Stephen King can shop the mall without someone bugging him...

 

but I don't run into too may 'aren't you...' questions outside of conferences.

 

As to editors, I think they just remember them...dunno...they may make a note of names. I never asked. J

 

I recognize someone I’ve critiqued at a writers workshop as soon as I see another story from them

 

even if the last time that person submitted to me was a year or two ago.

seigfried007

Wait a minute. We get graded?! (eek!)

Mary Rosenblum

Nah, seig. You either pass, or you don't. (You do)

Jean Lauzier

I got a lecture on this not long ago:--)

Mary Rosenblum

Passing or failing, she asks innocently?

Jean Lauzier

The "It isn't for a grade." thing...

 

I've repeated it many times lately:--)

Mary Rosenblum

More than one lecture, as I recall!

Jean Lauzier

But don't you find new writers do think it is for a grade or we have to write to someone else's expectations?

Mary Rosenblum

All the time. I say it over and over to students....'I'm not your English teacher, this isn't for a grade.... J  Broken record.

codeblue

What if you are on 12 for 2 or more yrs?

Mary Rosenblum

Finish it, code, and send it in! J  Set yourself a deadline.

 

Hi, Galatyne!  J

Jean Lauzier

I know you have before but want to talk about the novel course?

Mary Rosenblum

Sure. I’m loving it now that it's actually up and running.

Jean Lauzier

I'm enjoying the novel course. About how many students do you have for it?

Mary Rosenblum

Hmmm...I haven't kept count, but I've gotten quite a few over the past few weeks. People are really

 

tearing through those first few assignments.

xana

Folks, I just turned in #2 - and it was due last fall -- not the novel course - the regular one

Mary Rosenblum

Yeah, some students are just slow. Life gets in the way.

 

The average person takes two years for the Breaking into Print course.

paja

Hints on restarting an old ms, like 10yrs old?

Mary Rosenblum

Gosh...I think I'd probably start from scratch, myself. I think after ten years, I'd do a lot better job integrating a new story rather

 

than fixing the old one.  Just remember what it was about, paja...and start over.

xana

Yeah, when i signed up for the course I had no idea I'd be selling my house and moving across the country

Mary Rosenblum

Yeah, xana...that's that life thing.

paminnapa

Don’t you think now the regular course time has sped up since starting email lessons?

Mary Rosenblum

Oh yes! That two years estimate was based on snail mail. Email is SO much faster

 

and I can put live links to markets, articles, websites. I love it.

Jean Lauzier

I did the BIP by snail mail and am working on the novel course by email. It is much better:--)

Mary Rosenblum

I agree!

Jean Lauzier

Time for promo. What do you have coming out? I know the Modern Magic Anthology just went on sale...what else?

Mary Rosenblum

Let's see... I should have  Chimera coming out probably early in 07 from Fairwood, I have some stories coming out in anthologies...I'll post links on the website when they're in print.

 

I try to keep 'upcoming stuff' updated on my website. I'm not usually too far behind. J I'll even post my schedule there for WorldCon, so people can find me.

Jean Lauzier

Back Track is in the June issue of Ellery Queen right?

Mary Rosenblum

Yes, Jean, so a student tells me. :-) I don't have my contributors copies yet.

Jean Lauzier

Great. What other cons will you be attending this year?

Mary Rosenblum

Let's see...WisCon over Memorial Day weekend in Madison Wisconsin,

 

WorldCon in LA in August.  Oh yes..I'll do a couple of panels for Willamette Writers Conference in August, too.

 

World Fantasy con in November in Austin, OryCon, of course, here in Portland in November. I think that's it for this year.

writermom

Hmm must be nice my instructor and I are still doing snail mail.

Mary Rosenblum

Yeah, writer, not all instructors are comfortable editing onscreen. It's different than on the paper page.

codeblue

Do you ever do stuff in Colorado?

Mary Rosenblum

I haven't recently code. :-) I have a limited travel budget

 

so I have to pick my conferences carefully.

janecj333

The Random House print run for Chimera was in paperback, and higher than the Horizons print run in hardback?

Jean Lauzier

This was from a bit earlier:--)

Mary Rosenblum

Of course. Paperback runs are always higher. Hardcovers cost more and some people will wait for the paperback.

 

You get much higher royalties on hardcover than on paper, too. For that reason.

Jean Lauzier

This has been such fun. Any last words for us new and aspiring writers?

Mary Rosenblum

Believe in yourself and your writing. No matter how many rejections, no matter what anyone tells you. Keep writing, keep striving to get better, and keep sending your work out.

 

You know what?

 

About 32 years ago, I wrote Ursula LeGuin a fan letter and I asked her how to become a writer.

 

This is essentially what she told me. It was good advice. So I’m passing it on.

paminnapa

Thank you Mary, and thank you Jean(speckeldorf) for a great time!!!!

Mary Rosenblum

Thanks for coming all. And thank you Jean, for doing such a great job of moderating!

Jean Lauzier

Night y'all!

Mary Rosenblum

Night Jean!

 

Night all!

 

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