Interview Transcripts

Tamora Pierce: Writing the Young Adult Fantasy 12/9/04

Event start time:

Thu Dec 09 18:57:28 2004

Event end time:

Thu Dec 09 21:12:17 2004



Legend:
Questions from the Audience are presented in red.
Answers by the Speaker are in black.
The Moderator's comments are in blue.

Mary Rosenblum

Hello, all! Welcome to our Professional Connection Interview with Tamora Piece, the acclaimed fantasy writer for Young Adults.

Tamora Pierce

Hello, everyone!

Mary Rosenblum

Her book Tricksters' Magic

 

was voted number four in the Library Associations top ten books for teens which is VERY impressive

 

and I have to say that she's here because we were on a panel together at the world Science Fiction Convention

 

on writing the young adult protagonist, and I was SO impressed with her that I twisted her arm! LOL Actually, Tamora, you were very gracious about this

 

and thank you!

 

Welcome!

Tamora Pierce

You didn't need to twist REALLY hard!

Mary Rosenblum

Good thing. :-)

Tamora Pierce

All the guys in college said I was easy to persuade. ;-)

Mary Rosenblum

You were, and you're very busy...where are you off to next on your book tour?

Tamora Pierce

Books tours are done, Gott sei dank--I'm actually home for ten glorious weeks!

 

Next trip actually is the Boskone science fiction convention.

Mary Rosenblum

Good thing. I was beginning to wonder when you had time to write!

Tamora Pierce

Um, that would be right now. Right now is when I'm writing.

Mary Rosenblum

Let's see...you sold your first book in 1983, right? How many have you sold since then? I lost count!

Tamora Pierce

Sold? Hm. 28, I think. Five of which I have yet to write.

Mary Rosenblum

Wow. I’m impressed. :-) Good track record.

 

I won't ask about the due dates on the five.

mbvoelker

My 13 year old son and I are both crazy about your Circle of Magic/The Circle Opens series. A lot of times we are told as new writers to stick to a single POV character. Yet in those books you handle up to four major POV characters without ever losing the reader. Can you talk about handling the shifts so that readers always know whose head they are in?

Tamora Pierce

I actually just try to make it very clear from the moment I switch POVs that it’s the new kid in the first sentence. I know a number of writers will indicate the change with a double return, but I only do that if there's a time gap. I just firmly seat myself in the next character's head and keep going.

Mary Rosenblum

Do you consciously work on making that transition crystal clear to the reader?

Tamora Pierce

It just seems to follow naturally--as I switch to seeing from another character's eyes, that character immediately places her/his POV and world view on what s/he's seeing. These four characters are so distinctive that I usually don't have trouble. I do sometimes have to back up and rephrase exposition passages so they belong to a particular character, more for my editor than my readers.

 

Editors are very concrete thinkers.

Mary Rosenblum

So it's really a matter of shifting thoroughly into a new character-mindset?

Tamora Pierce

At the risk of sounding totally cootie-oid, character is what's easiest for me. I can slip into a new character like I can slip into an outsized t-shirt. Bruce Coville says I know more about my characters than any other writer he's met, and he knows a LOT of other writers.

Tamora Pierce

Plot--now, plot's hard.

Mary Rosenblum

Clearly that character first orientation works!

info

Can you define what a double return is?

Tamora Pierce

One paragraph break, and then another empty paragraph break so that there's an entire line of empty space between one paragraph and the next.

Mary Rosenblum

Info that is used to show a scene break or sometimes a shift to a new POV.

younger

Tamora, how do you get into the head of a young adult??

Tamora Pierce

I used to do a lot of acting as a kid, and a lot of radio acting in the 80s. I loved putting on a whole different person, and I think it helps me to develop characters.

Tamora Pierce

How do I get into the head of a young adult? Er . . . I'm not really very mature, you see.

Mary Rosenblum

I'm giggling...

 

Sorry. Couldn't help that. :-)

Tamora Pierce

Reaching back to the uber-sensitive mess I was as a teenager isn't that big of an effort. I also was a housemother in a group home for girls, a student social worker in juvenile court, and I co-founded, ran, and still belong to a discussion web (message board) frequented by teenagers, so if I need a touch-up, I know where to get it. But the truth is, I really am not very mature.

 

You can giggle, Mary. You remember what I was like at Worldcon!

Mary Rosenblum

I could simply see you as one of your heroes, that's all. It's great!

Tamora Pierce

But think about it, folks. One thing we ALL have in common is, we were teenagers. A lot of the basics remain the same.

 

I wish I were one of my heroes! Tris, now. When that girl calls down the thunder, she really calls it down!

Mary Rosenblum

But isn't that what you're doing as you write these books? Living that story as Tris and the others?

Tamora Pierce

You do both, as I think you know. On the immediate level, you live it as the character, with the ups and downs, and definitely the power rush of calling down whatever these mages call down, or the power rush of being Kel riding in a joust--and the depressions of being the character. Then there's the next level. The writer's like the little street sweeper guy in the Peabody and Sherman cartoons, following the parade with the broom, getting all the flower petals, setting it all up for the next parade.

 

And then the third level kicks in on rewrites, the editor, where you're the idiot with the clipboard and the magnifying glass.

 

F. Scott Fitzgerald put it something like this: an artist is the only person who can hold two opposing points of view and still function.

 

That's what we are. That's what we do.

Mary Rosenblum

That's true, isn't it? Hmmm..sort of like being a functional schizophrenic? Hadn't thought of it like that...

 

but I suppose it is a sort of split POV.

Tamora Pierce

Or a functional multiple personality, aware of and deliberately dealing with the separate personalities rather than integrating them and getting that degree in dentistry like Mom wanted you to.

Mary Rosenblum

Yep. Sounds familiar. :-) I have a question from a student, Paja, who couldn't make it tonight..

 

She asks: What depth of involvement with youth must one have to write for them? (I understand one should have as much as possible, but do I have to lead the youth group in order to write for youth?)

 

Is there really any concrete answer do you think?

Tamora Pierce

Leading the youth group is the worst thing you can do. For one thing, as the leader, you're the authority figure. It skews your view and it skews your reactions. You have to be not a member, but the person reading in the corner who's always there, or the person who cuts the cake, pours the drinks, and reads in the corner. Someone who's a fixture, because you don't want to hear who they are in front of adults. You want to hear who they are for themselves. Actually, while you don't see them, you're better off looking for teen chat rooms and passing as a teen yourself--and keeping your input into the conversation to a minimum. ...

Tamora Pierce

You want to be the librarian who knows the cool books, or the music store person who knows who the new groups are, or the dress boutique person. Bruce Coville said he drove his kids and their friends to games, lessons, performances--that's one way to do it. But being the grown-up? ::shudder:: No. Never. Come around SheroesCentral, my discussion web. Join in the conversation as a person, not an adult, if you aren't confident in your memories of your teen years.

Mary Rosenblum

You can find SheroesCentral from Tamora's website:  www.tamorapierce.com

Tamora Pierce

Most of the people I know who deal with teens because they like to do it tend to be more youthful and lively than the general run of grownups as a rule.

 

We all hang out together at library and teacher conferences.

pat7007

Would you recommend including a romance in a fantasy novel?

Tamora Pierce

If a romance fits, definitely. I know my readers like it; I know Sherwood Smith's COURT AND CROWN DUET have avid fans largely for the romance--it has to be well written, but it's greatly appreciated by the readers. In fact, Harlequin initiated a fantasy romance line last year, Luna, attracting some of the best fantasy writers in the genre, and it is doing very well for them. There's been a lot of recent fantasy romances, but this is the first line to market itself solely for that, and they're getting writers like Sarah Zettel and Catherine Asaro to do books for them. There's a demand, in teen and adults.

forest elf

Are there any set guidelines that define when a novel is Adult or YA? I know there are books out there sold as YA that adults love! And books that are sold as adult that young people have found and love. I ask because my main character is 17 & 18 in my book and I'm finding that dividing line blurred ....

Tamora Pierce

Any decently written book for teens or for intermediates is going to have plenty of crunchy stuff for an adult reader--in fact, most of my reading these days is YA and intermediate. There's a lot less slop, a lot less gratuitous sex and violence, and solid stories to be found in YA and intermediate.

 

As far as set guidelines go, these days, well, not much. The last bastion seems to be the age of the main protagonist: my first agent recommended I try splitting my adult novel into four YAs because my hero went from 10 to 20 in the course of the story. In her first books, however, Robin McKinley's heroes were in their late teens, so your book might depend on the kind of material you include. Is your character functioning as an adult in the adult world, or is the material so shockingly adult that it can only be an adult story? Mick Foley's TIETAM BROWN is 16 and Robin McKinley's DEERSKIN is about the same, but neither book is for teenagers at all--Tietam is about sexual awakening and pedal-to-the-metal exploration by Tietam's dad, and Deerskin begins with incestuous rape. Scout Finch never breaks puberty, but TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD is purely adult.

Mary Rosenblum

In other words, it's not the age of the protagonist, but what the book is ABOUT that matters...adult issues or teen issues?

Tamora Pierce

Exactly. It's also about the way in which the material is handled, and if it is there as a display to prove the book is adult, or for a set reason. I think my own books are a pretty good map for how far you can go in the sex (TRICKSTER'S QUEEN) and violence (MAGIC STEPS, COLD FIRE) department. Just keep in mind that, in any YA, sex, violence, substance use, and bad language has to be there for a REASON. If it isn't justified, and well justified, by the story, then it doesn't belong in a YA book. These things happen to teens--everyone understands that. It's how the writer approaches them that determines where they end up on the shelves.

writermom

What if it has both teen and adult issues?

Mary Rosenblum

Is it a case of decide which book you want to write, Tamora?

writermom

I have teens being pushed into adult situations like rescue and revenge, love and hate.

Tamora Pierce

But that's the very nature of the teen book. "Teen" is a newfangled category, relevant only really in the last 70 years or so. Before then, the period we call "teen" was considered "adult." These days teens are on that uncomfortable fulcrum between the world of child and adult, and they keep teetering into adult things. That's what teen books are. Do you read teen books at all? Because you might feel better about your characters dealing in adult situations if you read of all the adult areas other literary teens deal with, just as the real teens must. Right now I'm reading Edward Bloor's CRUSADER, in which a 15-year-old is raising herself after her mother's murder, dealing with a slowly boiling nexus of hate crimes in the arcade run by her family. I just finished a book about a girl dumped on a hostile great-aunt by a childish, runaway mother. This is what being a teenager is, and what teen books are.

Mary Rosenblum

And I think this brings up something that seems very obvious, but perhaps is not so obvious

 

that if you want to write in the YA field, you need to READ in the YA field!

Tamora Pierce

There's a lot of really good stuff out there. A lot of really great writers, a lot of really great books. Even if you don't like fantasy, which is going through a boom right now, there are so many great books for teens and intermediates out there.  In my last published book, I covered revolution, mixed-race prejudice, colonialism, spying, guerilla warfare, dynastic marriages and politics, terrorism, unmarried sex, infanticide, insanity, and murder. For starters.

Mary Rosenblum

Want to recommend a few, Tamora?

pan

Do you outline the entire series when you start on one, including how your character will change? You carry the thread through the books wonderfully - I loved Daine and Alanna and the way they grew in every book

Tamora Pierce

Book recommendations (f=fantasy, sf=science fiction, c=contemporary teens): John Marsden's SO MUCH TO TELL YOU (c), Brent Hartinger's THE GEOGRAPHY CLUB and THE LAST CHANCE TEXACO (c), Shannon Hale's THE GOOSE GIRL and ENNA BURNING (f), Holly Black's TITHE (f), Alison Goodman's SINGING THE DOGSTAR BLUES (sf), Susan Shaw's THE BOY IN THE BASEMENT (c), Margaret Peterson Haddix's AMONG THE HIDDEN (sf), M.T. Anderson's FEED (sf), Laurie Halse Anderson's SPEAK (c), Sarah Dessen's DREAMLAND (c), Nancy Werlin's THE KILLER'S COUSIN (c), Kathe Koja's BUDDHA BOY (c)--there's a start, and there are more on my webpage!

Mary Rosenblum

Thanks, Tamora. That's a great list.

Tamora Pierce

I have a very rough outline for books and quartets, but it is pretty rough. Alanna's the only one I was fairly accurate on, simply because I had the adult ms. to work from. For the rest, by the time I sit down to write, I've been thinking about a book for 4-6 years, so I have the first four chapters and the ending pretty well blocked out. Then I get to the middle and have to get people to bail me out. ...

 

The thing is, even when you're one of those organized souls who outline, and about half of us are, there isn't a fiction editor in the business who will hold you to your outline. They know even better than you do that once you sit down to do the actually writing, the story will grow and change, because stories are organic things. But they do like a rough idea, just so they can go to the marketing people and say, See? This is going to rock. Somehow.

guessit

Do you think that a good writer must focus on targeting a specific age, or is it that once you can write, it is possible to be a good writer for anyone aged 2 to 42...?

Tamora Pierce

I just write straight across, and whoever gets it, gets it. It turns out that I most like to write heroes who are teenagers, and I seem to get that viewpoint naturally, but I do it in such a fashion that it appeals to people from ages 8 to literally 80. That's who I get my mail from. The important thing is, whoever your audience is, write for them with respect. You can't find a quicker way to lose a kid audience than to write down to them. ...

 

People just don't get it about kid audiences these days. They are phenomenally sophisticated. They can literally tell what kind of book it is from the kind of lettering. They can tell a snow job within a page. And if you don't give them your best, sharpest, most honest effort, with respect for their intelligence and ability to perceive the realities of the world, they will toss you in a New York minute. They are a tough, critical audience, and they appreciate good writing a lot more than an adult audience. If you tell an adult audience a book is good, an awful lot of them will buy the book because they've been told it's good. Kids won't buy it unless it IS good.

 

You need a strong story. You need good characters. That's good writing for any age.

Mary Rosenblum

Well said, Tamora.

 

Question...most of your books are 'rated' by the publisher for age 12 and up

 

but a few are for 10 and up. Did you intentionally approach those books differently, or is this the publisher's label?

Tamora Pierce

Well, they are linear, poor things. They get all goofy if they can't categorize things. The ones that are 12 and up either have heroes who are 12 and up (I never use "heroine"), or there is sex and violence. Actually, then the hero is still over 12!

Mary Rosenblum

Rated PG 13.... :-)

 

I had a question about your past.

Tamora Pierce

Yep. Particularly if it's one of mine. ;-)

Mary Rosenblum

I found it interesting that you wrote a lot of stories and then simply stopped in tenth grade...didn't start again until late in college. Any idea why that happened?

Tamora Pierce

Oh. My relationship with my mother was, um, fraught. Particularly when it came to my writing. I sent a story to 17 Magazine in 10th grade. I got a very nice letter back about it not being right, and the format standards for magazine submissions. My mother asked me why I'd gotten a letter from 17. ...

 

I thought she'd be proud I had the stones to submit to a magazine. Instead she exploded on me. We had a dreadful fight, and I didn't write original fiction till the summer before my junior year in college, when I'd been away from home for 2 and a half years.

 

Something must have still been cooking in my brain during those five years, though, because I didn't come back as a teen writer--I made my first adult sale a year later.

Mary Rosenblum

Ouch. Yeah, families sure can play a role, can they not.

Tamora Pierce

Oh, yeah. But it goes both ways--the person who started me writing was my dad.

Mary Rosenblum

Yes...I loved that story. :-)

 

Good for him.

Tamora Pierce

Yeah, he was a really cool guy.

Mary Rosenblum

I think you mentioned earlier that you find it easy to reach back to those teen years to find

 

the teenager you need. Has your family and past provided conflict/character/story for you?

Tamora Pierce

Let's see. I had to learn to write sympathetic mothers--no lie. My first agent (a mom) pointed out that this was something I was going to have to fix, and I'm still working on it. (I'm getting better!)

 

I based Alanna on my younger sister, whose first word was no--and she meant it. My stepmother is the Shang Wildcat, Eda Bell, and Pa, who kept demanding a part for a mean old biker, became the Lord Provost. My oldest stepbrother doesn't know it, but he's about to become Lord Provost 200 years before my dad

 

And for conflict, understanding of people, and understanding of character--all of that goes into every book. We all have to draw on our own experiences, whether we're writing contemporary or fantasy, because we have to write from what we've learned.

Mary Rosenblum

Exactly! Write what you know, and I'm laughing out loud (my dogs are perplexed if enthusiastic) because

 

I've always said that we all end up writing our family histories in our fiction...although I don't think I'll say where mine ended up. :-)

Tamora Pierce

Dogs are always enthusiastic and some other emotion (unless the other emotion involves the vet or a spanking). And I always save those places for former bosses and ex-boyfriends. I had the head of Chase Manhattan Bank eaten by a kraken, and I killed a former boyfriend twice.

Mary Rosenblum

Yes, vengeance can be sweet. :-)

 

And you can do it more than once.

Tamora Pierce

And it gets a great laugh out of a room full of school kids!

Mary Rosenblum

Oh, I bet! You probably motivate future writers right there!

mbvoelker

Your Circle of Magic/The Circle Opens books are really rather short. Yet I've never been so convinced that I was immersed in the real cultural variations of a living, breathing world. You've effectively created not one, but many societies and cultures in very few words. How do you do it?

Tamora Pierce

I do try. The idea is to get them used to the strange notion that this can be fun.

Mary Rosenblum

Amazing thought, huh?

Tamora Pierce

As for cultures: Thank you! I steal. I'm not at all good at making things up, and I discovered by borrowing from history that I could loot--er, base my own cultures loosely on cultures from my own world. I set out with the Circle universe to break away from medieval Europe and go to another part of the world I love, the Middle East and Central Asia in the time of the Silk Roads. I get the chance to pore over cookbooks, design books, tourist guides (I always need a lot of pictures), phrase books and dictionaries, maps . . . I have a huge cork board in my office where I tack up the photos I use for characters and places, music from the area I'm dealing with, a huge desk so I can spread out my books. As long as I have all the stuff I need, I have great fun, and when I don't, I go crazy until I get it all.

Mary Rosenblum

Do you feel a certain sense of letdown when you are 'done' with this world at the end of the book?

 

Now you have to leave and go play somewhere else?

Tamora Pierce

Sometimes I do. I have this . . . thing for the Nabatean city of Petra. The first time I just read about it in a novel by James Michener when I was 16. I didn't even know its name until I was in my 20s. ...

 

I tried to exorcise it in ALANNA: THE FIRST ADVENTURE as the Black City, but I kept getting books about it. I went nuts during "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" because I recognized it right away. Finally I decided to do it right in STREET MAGIC with Chammur. Except . . . it still haunts me. I'm still getting the books. Maybe I'll actually GO there before I write something else with it.

 

If the Jordanians are still talking to us, anyway.

Mary Rosenblum

I was going to say...IF you can go there! LOL

speckledorf

Do you feel there is a genre in YA that is more popular than the others at this time?

Mary Rosenblum

Fantasy seems to be the top seller, yes?

Tamora Pierce

Fantasy is getting the ink. Contemporary is still the best represented, but fantasy is definitely the most high profile, and a lot of the best writing is happening in fantasy at the moment. I'd love to see that start happening in SF, actually.

Mary Rosenblum

You and me, both. That's sure my intention! :-)

Tamora Pierce

And there are warning signs of a turn--I've heard more than a few editors grumble about fantasy in general and series/trilogy in particular.

Mary Rosenblum

That they're getting too many or that they're no longer selling well?

Tamora Pierce

There are some houses--Viking and Tor Teen--looking for SF.

Mary Rosenblum

Warner has a new line, too, for YA SF.

Tamora Pierce

Getting to be too many and getting to be too much of the same kind of thing.

Mary Rosenblum

Well, trends come and go in fiction, that is for sure.

Tamora Pierce

Trends always come and go. The good stuff will stay. When I came into YA it was all horror. I just wrote what I wanted, and found enough people who liked what I had to say. That's how it always works.

 

Nobody gets anywhere for the long term in publishing by writing what's popular, as you know, Mary. By the time someone writes what's happening, the trend has started to turn.

Mary Rosenblum

That’s so true. You need to start the next trend...

 

If you write for THIS trend, it will be over before your book is published.

pan

Do you have a "Magic Rule Book" for each book/character so that you're consistent with what the magic can/cannot do?

Tamora Pierce

I have the character making progress from book to book as s/he might in everyday life in a less fantastic skill, with increasing levels of difficulty: Daine goes from hearing animals to speaking to healing to shapeshifting, for example. The Circle kids must first simply get a grip on their power, then begin simple exercises with it, except their power comes from outside themselves, so it's less about simple and still about control.

 

I just keep climbing steps with each book, and keeping in mind that it can never be easy, and no individual can be all powerful. Numair is immensely powerful only in certain ways; in others he's well-nigh useless. Tris can blow up a ship with lightning, but she can't stave off collateral damage or bad dreams. If I keep my sense of reality in hand, I manage to keep the magic from overpowering the characters or the writing.

paja

Is any of your magic founded in the unexplained or amazing facets of actual life?

Tamora Pierce

For the basic manual I use the Wiccan handbooks of Scott Cunningham--Wicca is pretty moral as magical systems go, plugged into the natural world, and balanced. For more esoteric theory, I start looking at weird **** like quantum mechanics, dark matter, and the Chinese idea of ch'i. Then I take a couple of aspirin and lie down for a while before I float off the face of the earth. I tend to think sparrows and cats are magical, so I impress easy.

 

I've also found that with the Circle universe in particular

 

my magic takes my characters a lot closer to modern science, particularly in areas like medicine and forensics. It gets really interesting when you have teams doing epidemiological research in a lab in a culture that doesn't have rolled glass or plastic gloves.

Mary Rosenblum

Yes, that can stretch your headspace. :-) You mean cats aren't magical? My cat Niki will be surprised to hear that.

Tamora Pierce

I didn't say they weren't. I think they are.

Mary Rosenblum

You might be right about those sparrows, too. :-) I have an expanding family that inhabits my kiwi vine on my porch...

 

they do some amazing things.

Tamora Pierce

(As Scooter looks at me balefully from the top of my monitor, as if to say, "Darn straight we are.")

 

I love sparrows. They have cojones the size of grapefruits.

Mary Rosenblum

They certainly let me know when I forgot to fill the feeder last night!

forest elf

When sending a ms with a cover letter ...is mentioning that the enclosed is a first in a series a "no-no" ?

Mary Rosenblum

You've certainly done well with series, Tamora.

Tamora Pierce

No, you definitely need to mention there will be other stories. But it's also to your advantage to make the first book a story that winds up in the first book and stands on its own. Actually, it's to your advantage to do that as much as possible with each book in a series. ...

\

There are going to be some times when you can't do that. Obviously if Kel's a page, there is is still a book about her being a squire and a knight to come. But at least have a story arc tied up in the book so it's got a conclusion that satisfies.

Mary Rosenblum

No 'slice of sausage' series, hear hear!!!

speckledorf

Do you see YA SF as the next trend or is that wishful thinking?

Mary Rosenblum

Oh, I WISH!

writermom

Me too

Mary Rosenblum

Well, we can hope, writermom...you never know.

Tamora Pierce

Trend? I can't promise trend. If that's what you want, I'd look more at YA chick lit (God, that term) or YA mystery. But there are a dedicated handful of YA editors who want to put life back into YA sf. SF as a whole is graying, and badly needs an infusion of young blood, particularly young readers. This is one of the places where they're going to get them, and there are editors and writers who mean to help it along.

Mary Rosenblum

So Tamora, you have patiently answered a host of questions...want to beat your own drum a bit here?

Tamora Pierce

Looking for new trends is like trying to read fortunes in the beans that stick to the pot after you burned them, you know.

Mary Rosenblum

What do you have coming out next. I always thought...

 

burned rice was more accurate myself..LOL

Tamora Pierce

Any way you look at it, burned stuff usually just means scour the pot. As as sign of a publishing trend, it means the booksellers are going to send back boxes of returns to clear their shelves for new stuff.

 

Next? Yeesh. Fall 2005: I co-edited an anthology with Josepha Sherman, YOUNG WARRIORS, hardcover from Random House, with stories from Bruce Holland Rogers, the Stirlings, Esther Friesner, Janis Ian, Holly Black, me . . . And THE CIRCLE REFORGED will be out from Scholastic in hardcover. It's a stand-alone, about 400 pages in ms., bringing the four together at 18 in the hothouse atmosphere of the Namornese court.

 

Nobody gets killed. I can hardly hold my head up in public.

Mary Rosenblum

What, nobody dies? Wow! I'm chuckling. Sounds like a grand finale to me. Or a new beginning?

Tamora Pierce

Neither. It's just an aberration. I'm sure of it. The right medication and I'll be back on my rails in the next book!

Mary Rosenblum

LOL

 

Tamora you have been a great guest, thank you.

 

Glad to hear that you can actually have some writing time now.

mbvoelker

This has been fabulous. Thank you very much.

Tamora Pierce

Thanks, Mary. I had a great time. I guess that's my cue to go back to work--thank you, everyone!

Mary Rosenblum

Thank you all for coming. I think Tamora had some very sound advice about the craft of YA.

Mary Rosenblum

I'm glad that she was able to join us.

 

Return to Interview Transcripts


Home | Writing Course | Short Story | Full Story Writing Test 
 
Send Me Full Info | Enroll | Our Instructors | Our CredentialsSample Lesson 
College Credits | Tax Deductibility | From Overseas  | Writer's Bookstore  
Free Writer's News | Life Support for Writers | Chat Room  | Live Forum | Writing Craft
Calendar of Events | Professional Connection | Transcripts | Post a Note | Surviving & Thriving
 
Student Center | Privacy Policy | Web EditorComments | Writing for Children 

LongRidge Writers Group
91 Long Ridge Road, West Redding, Connecticut 06896
Telephone: 1-800-624-1476 ~ Fax: 203-792-8406
Email:
InformationService@LongRidgeWritersGroup.com

Copyright Writer's Institute, Inc., 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006
No part of the electronic transmission to which this notice is appended may be reproduced or redistributed in any form or manner without the express written permission of Writer's Institute, Inc.